Invisalign

Do you need braces but don’t like the idea of metal brackets, wires, and rubber bands? If your teeth could use some straightening then it’s time to consider Invisalign. Our Brooklyn dentists at Brooklyn Dental are authorized and experienced Invisalign suppliers and are ready to help give you the smile you desire.

 

As a Brooklyn Invisalign-certified dentist, Dr. Amirian and his staff help patients achieve a straight, beautiful smile without impacting their social life.  The Invisalign advantage enables patients to wear cosmetically undetectable braces.  Unlike traditional metal braces, Invisalign trays allow the patient to comfortably achieve a straight smile with removable aligners.  Because the aligner trays can be removed at will, patients do not have to follow a restricted diet or risk poor gum health.

The typical length of treatment ranges from 18 to 30 weeks, with a varying number of trays depending on each patient’s case.  Whether you have open gaps, crooked teeth, crowding, malformed bite, or nearly any other teeth alignment issue, Invisalign can help you achieve a straighter smile.  Additionally, Invisalign trays can be used to precede veneer or dental implant placement, helping either cosmetic procedure produce a more predictable outcome.

Dr. Amirian and his colleagues have successfully completed many complex Invisalign cases, often for patients who were denied Invisalign treatment by other dentists.  Dr. Amirian and his staff attribute their high success rate to their continuing thirst for knowledge and completion of numerous advanced cosmetic dentistry courses and training on the latest advances in Invisalign dentistry.

Benefits of Invisalign:

  • Eat the same items you already do.
  • Inconspicuous alignment of teeth.
  • No uncomfortable metal bands or wires that irritate the mouth.
  • Removable and can be cleaned easily.
  • Takes less time than alternative methods to straighten teeth.

What is Invisalign?

Invisalign involves a few steps to get started.  Initially, Dr. Amirian will need to determine if you are a good candidate for Invisalign.  Many Invisalign dentists will turn a patient away or deem them an inappropriate candidate.  Dr. Amirian takes on many of these more challenging cases, enabling more patients to benefit from Invisalign clear braces.

After determining candidacy, our Brooklyn patient’s teeth are input into a digital software program that projects the final outcome and shows the patient what their teeth will look like once treatment is complete.  The software’s output is then sent to Invisalign headquarters where a complete set of clear trays will be created.  Dr. Amirian works on each individual Invisalign case directly with an Invisalign representative over the phone to ensure the trays are manufactured to perfection.

After Dr. Amirian receives your set of aligner trays, you will have another appointment scheduled to fit your first invisible aligner.  At regular intervals, you will again visit Dr. Amirian to change aligner trays as your teeth gradually shift into the correct placement.

If you are seeking Invisalign in Brooklyn or want a beautiful, straight smile, contact our office to schedule your consultation today.

How Invisalign Works

Invisalign treatment consists of a series of custom-made aligning trays.  The dentist changes the trays every several weeks to fit the new tooth configuration.  In addition to the reduced visual impact, Invisalign® aligning trays can be temporarily removed for important occasions – meaning that treatment duration is patient-controlled.  A great number of people report complete satisfaction with both the Invisalign treatment and the stunning results.

What kind of bite problems can Invisalign correct?

Invisalign corrects the same dental problems as traditional metal braces; the only difference is that Invisalign trays are almost invisible to the naked eye, and can be removed at will.

Here are some problems that are commonly corrected with Invisalign:

  • Overcrowding – This occurs when there is too little space for the teeth to align normally in the mouth.  Overcrowding can cause tooth decay and increase the likelihood of gum disease.

     

  • Large gaps between teeth – This can sometimes occur because teeth are missing or because the jaw continues to grow abnormally.

     

  • Crossbite – This common dental problem occurs when one or multiple upper teeth bite inside the lower teeth.  As a consequence, uneven wear can lead to bone erosion and gum disease.

     

  • Overbite – This problem occurs when the upper teeth project further than, or completely cover, the lower teeth.  Eventually, jaw pain and TMJ may occur.

     

  • Underbite – This is the inverse of the overbite; the lower teeth project further than, or completely cover, the upper teeth.  Eventually, jaw pain and TMJ can occur.

     

What does Invisalign treatment involve?

First, the dentist needs to devise an initial treatment plan before creating the special aligning trays.  Three-dimensional digital images are taken of the entire jaw.  These images allow the dentist to move specific teeth on the screen, view the jaw from different angles, and also foresee what the face might look like in years to come.  In essence, this technology can show how Invisalign trays will change the facial aesthetics.

Once planning is complete, a unique set of aligners is made.  The total amount of aligners required varies with each individual case, but 20-29 sets per arch is typical.

What are some considerations when wearing Invisalign trays?

Life with Invisalign aligning trays may take several weeks to get used to.  The trays should be worn constantly, except when eating and drinking.  It is important to remove the trays when consuming food or drink because food can become trapped between the tray and the teeth, causing tooth decay.

Usually, new trays are necessary every two weeks, and progress between appointments can be seen with the naked eye. There is no doubt that Invisalign aligning trays have revolutionized orthodontics.  Invisalign is renowned for being both comfortable and effective.

If you have questions about Invisalign, please contact our office.

Orthodontic Dictionary

The following are the most commonly used terms in orthodontics.  If you have any questions about orthodontics or would like to schedule an appointment, please contact our office.

Anterior Teeth: The upper and lower six front teeth on each arch.

Appliance: Any orthodontic device which moves or retains teeth.  Appliances may also alter the positioning of the jaw.

Arch: The entire upper or lower jaw.

Archwire: The metal wire that connects orthodontic brackets.  This wire guides the teeth into their new alignment.

Band with bracket: Metal bands (rings) that are generally cemented around the back teeth.

Braces: Fixed orthodontic appliances designed to align teeth.

Brackets: The tiny metal, ceramic or clear brackets that are affixed to each individual tooth on the arch.

Brushing: This is a crucial part of home dental care.  Orthodontists recommend those wearing braces to brush after every meal and snack to eliminate bacteria and plaque.

Buccal: The outer (cheek) side of posterior teeth in the lower and upper arches.

Cephalometric Radiograph: A side X-ray of the face and head used to show growth and development.

Chain: Elastics connected together and placed around the brackets to stabilize the archwire and gently close spaces.

Class I Malocclusion: Molars are correctly aligned, but there is an anterior/posterior crossbite, an openbite or overcrowding on the arches.

Class II Malocclusion: Also known as an overbite.  The upper front teeth are positioned further forward than the lower teeth.

Class III Malocclusion: Also known as an underbite.  The lower front teeth are positioned further forward than the upper front teeth.

Closed Bite: The upper front teeth completely overlap the bottom teeth causing a deep overbite.

Congenitally Missing Teeth: Some permanent teeth fail to develop and erupt due to genetic factors.

Crossbite: A malocclusion in which the upper back teeth bite inside or outside the lower back teeth, or the lower front teeth bite in front of the upper front teeth.

De-banding: The removal of orthodontic bands from the teeth.

De-bonding: The removal of affixed orthodontic brackets from the teeth.

Diagnostic Records: Records used to assess, plan and implement treatments.  These records usually include medical and dental history, radiographs, panoramic radiographs, bite molds and intraoral/extraoral photographs.

Digital Radiograph: Digital X-rays of the teeth which can be viewed, stored, and transmitted via computer.

Elastics: Some braces may require that elastic rubber bands be attached to exert additional pressure to an individual tooth or a group of teeth.

Eruption: The way in which teeth surface through the gums inside the mouth.

Fixed Orthodontic Appliances: Orthodontic appliances which are affixed to the teeth by the orthodontist and cannot be removed by the patient.

Flossing: An essential part of home care that removes debris and plaque from above and below the gumline.

Functional Appliances: Orthodontic appliances that use the muscle movement created by swallowing, eating and speaking to gently move and align the teeth and jaws.

Gingiva: The gums and soft tissue around the teeth.

Headgear: A removable appliance comprised of a brace and external archwire.  This device modifies growth and promotes tooth movement.

Impressions: Teeth impressions are taken to allow the orthodontist to see exactly how a patient’s teeth fit together.

Interceptive Treatment: Treatment performed on children who have a mixture of adult and baby teeth.  Early treatment can help reduce the need for major orthodontic treatment in the future.

Invisalign®: A newer, removable type of dental aligner that is completely transparent and doesn’t interfere with eating because it’s removable.  Not all patients are candidates for Invisalign®.

Ligating Modules: An elastic donut-shaped ring which helps secure the archwire to the bracket.

Ligation: Securing the archwire to the brackets.

Lingual Side: The side of the teeth (in both arches) that is closest to the tongue.

Malocclusion: Literally means “bad bite” in Latin, and refers to teeth that do not fit together correctly.

Mandible: The lower jaw.

Maxilla: The upper jaw.

Mouthguard: A removable plastic or rubber device that protects teeth and braces from sporting injuries.

Open Bite: Upper and lower teeth fail to make contact with each other.  This malocclusion is generally classified as anterior or posterior.

Orthodontics: The unique branch of dentistry concerned with diagnosing, preventing and correcting malocclusions and jaw irregularities.

Orthodontist: A dental specialist who prevents, diagnoses and treats jaw irregularities and malocclusions.  Orthodontists must complete two or three additional years of college after dental school and complete a residency program.

Palatal Expander: A removable or fixed device designed to expand the palate in order create room on either the upper or lower arch.

Panoramic Radiograph: An extraoral (external) X-ray that shows the teeth and jaws.

Plaque: The sticky film of saliva, food particles and bacteria that contributes to gum disease and tooth decay.

Posterior Teeth: Back teeth.

Removable Appliance: An orthodontic brace or device that can be removed at will by the patient.  It must be worn for the designated amount of time each day to be effective.

Separators: A wire loop or elastic ring placed between the teeth to create room for the subsequent placement of bands or orthodontic appliance.

Space Maintainer: A fixed appliance used to hold space for permanent (adult) tooth.  This is usually used when a baby tooth has been lost earlier than anticipated.

Wax: Orthodontic relief wax is a home care remedy used to alleviate irritations caused by braces.

Wires: Attached to the brackets to gently move the teeth into proper alignment.

What is a Malocclusion?

A malocclusion is an incorrect relationship between the maxilla (upper arch) and the mandible (lower arch), or a general misalignment of the teeth.  Malocclusions are so common that most individuals experience one, to some degree.  The poor alignment of the teeth is thought to be a result of genetic factors combined with poor oral habits, or other factors in the early years.

Moderate malocclusion commonly requires treatment by an orthodontist.  Orthodontists are dentists who specialize in the treatment of malocclusions and other facial irregularities.

The following are three main classifications of malocclusion:

  • Class I – The occlusion is typical, but there are spacing or overcrowding problems with the other teeth.

     

  • Class II – The malocclusion is an overbite (the upper teeth are positioned further forward than the lower teeth).  This can be caused by the protrusion of anterior teeth or the overlapping of the central teeth by the lateral teeth.

     

  • Class III – Prognathism (also known as “underbite”) is a malocclusion caused by the lower teeth being positioned further forward than the upper teeth.  An underbite usually occurs when the jawbone is large or the maxillary bone is short.

Reasons for treating a malocclusion

A severe malocclusion may lead to skeletal disharmony of the lower face.  In a more extreme case, the orthodontist may work in combination with a maxillofacial dentist to reconstruct the jaw.  It is never too late to seek treatment for a malocclusion.  Children and adults alike have completed orthodontic realignment procedures and have been delighted with the resulting even, straight smile.

Here are some of the main reasons to seek orthodontic treatment for a malocclusion:

  • Reduced risk of tooth decay – A malocclusion often causes an uneven wear pattern on the teeth.  The constant wearing of the same teeth can lead to tooth erosion and decay.

     

  • Better oral hygiene – A malocclusion can be caused by overcrowding.  When too many teeth are competing for too little space, it can be difficult to clean the teeth and gums effectively.  It is much easier to clean straight teeth that are properly aligned.

     

  • Reduced risk of TMJ – Temporomandibular jaw syndrome (TMJ) is thought to be caused by a malocclusion.  Headaches, facial pains and grinding teeth during sleep all result from the excessive pressure to the temporomandibular joint.  Realigning the teeth reduces pressure, and eliminates these symptoms.

How is a malocclusion treated?

A malocclusion is usually treated with dental braces.  The orthodontist takes panoramic X-rays, conducts visual examinations, and takes bite impressions of the whole mouth before deciding on the best course of treatment.  If a malocclusion is obviously caused by overcrowding, the orthodontist may decide an extraction is the only way to create enough space for the realignment.  However, in the case of an underbite, crossbite or overbite, there are several different orthodontic appliances available, such as:

  • Fixed multibracket braces – This type of dental braces consists of brackets cemented to each tooth, and an archwire that connects each one.  The orthodontist adjusts or changes the wire on a regular basis to train the teeth into proper alignment.

     

  • Removable devices – There are many non-fixed dental braces available to treat a malocclusion.  Retainers, headgear and palate expanders are amongst the most common.  Retainers are generally used to hold the teeth in the correct position while the jawbone grows properly around them.
  • Invisalign® – These dental aligners are removable and invisible to the naked eye.  Invisalign® works similarly to fixed dental braces but does not impact the aesthetics of the smile.

If you have any questions about malocclusions, please contact our office.

(718) 619-8777